City Supports Conjunto Festival Relocation

Named after Narciso Martinez, who is considered the “Father of the Texas Mexican Conjunto” music, the Narciso Martinez Cultural Arts Center is dedicated to the preservation, promotion and development of Mexican heritage in visual arts, music, theater, dance, film and literary works. Photo: Narciso Martinez Cultural Arts Center

Named after Narciso Martinez, who is considered the “Father of the Texas Mexican Conjunto” music, the Narciso Martinez Cultural Arts Center is dedicated to the preservation, promotion and development of Mexican heritage in visual arts, music, theater, dance, film and literary works. Photo: Narciso Martinez Cultural Arts Center

by Tony Vindell/LFN

For the last 25 years, the largest gathering of conjunto musicians and fans have met in San Benito, but that is about to change this year.

The festival, which is one of Narciso Martinez Cultural Arts Center main activity, is relocating to Los Fresnos after organizers of the event said they can no longer afford paying what the Resaca City charges today – a whopping $17,500.

After all, they said the festival is not a money-making event but rather a cultural activity to preserve a musical genre.

On Tuesday, Feb. 13, Los Fresnos City Council approved a motion supporting the festival relocation after officials with the non-profit organization made a second pitch seeking support.

“I think it’s great that they decided to come to Los Fresnos,” Mayor Polo Narvaez said. “It will be a great opportunity for the city.”

He then asked if the festival was going to be a one-time event and was told no.

Rogelio Nuñez, the organization director who went before the board of the Community Development Corp. two weeks ago, answered saying it could be a lifetime thing for Los Fresnos.

The LFCDC pledged to allocate $5,000 for the festival, tentatively scheduled to be held October 19 through 31 of this year, while the city council voted to spend about $3,000 to pay for overtime to police officers working during the festival.

Enrique Juarez, president of the LFCDC board, said at the time the city was getting a deal served on a silver platter.

Nuñez and his staff were ecstatic about the support they received from the city and its leaders.

“Do you want me to express how I feel?” he said afterwards. “The police station is right there.”

The festival attracts an average of 5,000 people and having it here works hand-in-hand with what city and business leaders said they want to make Los Fresnos a cultural tourist destination.

In other business, the council approved a 2017 racial profile report prepared by the police department.

A total of 6,126 traffic stops were made during the year, resulting in 5,645 citations, 374 arrests and 107 of both.

Concerning race or ethnicity, the report shows police pulled over: 5,173 Hispanics, 671 Caucasians, 138 African-Americans, 49 Asians, four Native Americans and one Middle Eastern.

And despite the bad rap Los Fresnos has received throughout the years as being one of Texas’ most notorious speed traps, local police issue an average of 16 tickets a day.

“It’s not a lot for a year,” City Manager Mark Milum said. “Some days, like during Spring Break, is higher than, but sixteen stops are not a lot.”

Share This Post

Google1DeliciousDiggGoogleStumbleuponRedditTechnoratiYahooBloggerMyspaceRSS

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *